Facts & Statistics



"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world: Indeed it's the only thing that ever has."
Black households have only 10 cents in wealth for every dollar held by white households.
In 2016, the median wealth of non-Hispanic white households was $171,000. That's 10 times the wealth of black households ($17,100)—a larger gap than in 2007. The Great Recession of 2007-2009 triggered a stark decline in wealth for U.S. families and further widened the already large wealth gap between white and black households. Yet the black-to-white wealth gap has evolved differently for families at different income levels, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of Federal Reserve data. The wealth gap increased between middle-income black and white families, but shrank between lower-income black and white families from 2007 to 2016. Much of the reduction in the wealth gap among lower-income families was driven by a sharp decrease in wealth for whites.



A war waged by deed of title has dispossessed 98% of black agricultural landowners in America.
Owners of small farms everywhere, black and white alike, have long been buffeted by larger economic forces. But what happened to black landowners in the South, and particularly in the Delta, is distinct, and was propelled not only by economic change but also by white racism and local white power. A war waged by deed of title has dispossessed 98 percent of black agricultural landowners in America. They have lost 12 million acres over the past century. But even that statement falsely consigns the losses to long-ago history. In fact, the losses mostly occurred within living memory, from the 1950s onward. Today, except for a handful of farmers like the Scotts who have been able to keep or get back some land, black people in this most productive corner of the Deep South own almost nothing of the bounty under their feet.



Blacks are almost twice as likely to be pulled over by police as whites.
In their book Suspect Citizens, Frank R. Baumgartner, Derek A. Epp and Kelsey Shoub reviewed 20 million traffic stops. In an interview with The Post, they shared what they found: "Blacks are almost twice as likely to be pulled over as whites—even though whites drive more on average," "blacks are more likely to be searched following a stop," and "just by getting in a car, a black driver has about twice the odds of being pulled over, and about four times the odds of being searched." They found that blacks were more likely to be searched despite the fact they're less likely than whites to be found with contraband as a result of those searches.



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